i5 vs i7

i5 vs i7

Intel Core i5 vs i7 CPU Processors Comparison
i5 vs i7

Intel re-released its Core i3/i5/i7 processors to match up with their new architecture, the Sandy Bridge. These processors are improved versions of the previous ones of the same name. We will compare each processor to each other to know which the best deal is for you. Here is our take on the i5 vs i7 comparisons.

The Sandy Bridge is a faster architecture which needs faster lines of processors. The i3/i5/i7 might have the same names but they are actually a different set of hardware. The numbers on their names will give you an idea on their performance. The Core i7 is faster than the Core i5. The latter is consequently cheaper than the former.

 

 

THE PRICE – i5 vs i7

Since we already stated that the i5 is cheaper than the i7, we will now provide the numbers.  The Sandy Bridge line of processors is mostly made up of i5 processors. You can buy one for as low as $177 to as high as $216 with base clock speeds between 2.8 GHz and 3.3 GHz. Only two Core i7 products are available as of now: Core i7-2600 and Core i7-2600K. The “K” has to do something with the Integrated Graphics Processor (IGP) which we will talk about later. Both Core i7 products offer 3.4 GHz base clock speeds. The i7-2600 can be bought at $294 while the other i7 is priced between $317 and $326. One may notice that a 100 MHz difference in speed is already worth $78. The difference in base clock speed is not the only reason why the i7 is much more expensive.

 

 

THE PERFORMANCE – i5 vs i7

The ability of the Core i7 to do hyper threading is another reason why it is more expensive than the Core i5. Hyper-threading is a technology used to improve the computer’s multitasking capabilities. Basically, the operating system works with two virtual processors although it is only working with one “physical” processor. For a Core i7 which is quad-core, the OS sees it as a processor having eight cores. The more cores the better that is why the Core i7 can be faster than the Core i5.

 

However, the advantages of hyper threading can only be seen when dealing with programs that does multi-threading. Examples of such programs are AutoCad and Adobe Photoshop. If you aren’t using these programs then you might find no use of Core I7’s hyper threading feature.

 

Both Core i5 and Core i7 offer turbo boost technology. This means both can readily increase their base clock speeds. The Core i7 can boost its speed by 400 MHz while the Core i5 can increment its speed to 300 MHz. Aside from this, the Core i7 is the only one to have virtualization technology for directed I/O and trusted execution. Virtualization for directed I/O is a technology wherein guest virtual machines can directly use peripheral devices through DMA and interrupt remapping. Trusted execution is a means to improve computer security against malicious programs.

 

The built in graphics processor or IGP is a noteworthy addition to the new Core processors. Don’t think that you wouldn’t need separate video memory because of this. The IGP in these processors still can’t match the performance of high end graphics card. Nevertheless, it can do the job at lower power consumption. Intel created two versions of the IGP: 2000 and 3000. The 3000 can process graphical information 50% quicker then 2000. Both the Core i5 and Core i7 support IGP 3000 with their Core i5-2500K and Core i7-2600K versions.

 

 

Summary of Specs

Product Name

Core i5 (2500K)

Core i7 (2600K)

Price

$216

$294

# of Cores

4

4

# of Threads

4

8

Clock Speed

3.3 GHz

3.4 GHz

Max Turbo Frequency

3.7 GHz

3.8 GHz

Cache

6 MB

8 MB

Bus/Core Ratio

33

34

System Bus

5 GT/s

5 GT/s

Instruction Set

64-bit

64-bit

Lithography

32 nm

32 nm

Max TDP

95 W

95 W

Memory Specifications

Max Memory Size

32 GB

32 GB

Memory Types

DDR3-1066/1333

DDR3-1066/1333

# of Memory Channels

2

2

Max Memory Bandwidth

21 GB/s

21 GB/s

Graphics Specifications

Processor Graphics

Yes

Yes

Graphics Model

Intel® HD Graphics 3000

Intel® HD Graphics 3000

Intel® Quick Sync Video

Yes

Yes

Intel® InTru™ 3D Technology,

Yes

Yes

Intel® Insider™

Yes

Yes

Intel® Wireless Display

No

No

Intel® Flexible Display Interface (Intel® FDI)

Yes

Yes

Intel® Clear Video HD Technology

Yes

Yes

Dual Display Capable

Yes

Yes

Advanced Technologies

Intel® Turbo Boost Technology

2.0

2.0

Intel® vPro Technology

No

Yes

Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology

No

Yes

Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x)

Yes

Yes

Intel® Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d)

No

Yes

Intel® Trusted Execution Technology

No

Yes

AES New Instructions

Yes

Yes

Intel® 64

Yes

Yes

Idle States

Yes

Yes

Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® Technology

Yes

Yes

Thermal Monitoring Technologies

Yes

Yes

Intel® Fast Memory Access

Yes

Yes

Intel® Flex Memory Access

Yes

Yes

Execute Disable Bit

Yes

Yes

 

 

i5 VS i7 – THE VERDICT

The i7 is a good choice for those who are frequently using programs that have high demands for its processor. The hyper-threading feature of the Core i7 enables it to be a tad faster than the Core i5 as well as its higher base clock speed and turbo boost. But for an ordinary computer user who does not deal daily with heavy graphics design, the Core i5 will suffice. A $78 dollar for a 100 MHz difference in speed is too much. We are going for the Core i5 on this i5 vs i7 debate.

Be Sociable, Share!

No related posts.